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WhistlePig Whiskey and Grammy Award-winning country music duo and reigning CMA Duo of the Year Brothers Osborne are celebrating "100 for all, all for 100" this holiday season with the launch of their new whiskey collaboration. The WhistlePig PiggyBack Legends Series: Brothers Osborne Barrel …

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Arts & Culture

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The new owners of Richland Fine Art Gallery will celebrate the reopening with a first look weekend on Nov. 19-20 from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Fresh off its Emmy Award win for the televised adaptation, Nashville’s Nutcracker will return to TPAC Dec. 9–24, 2022. Deemed Music City’s favorite holiday tradition, this year’s production will feature the beloved, unique-to-Nashville story, plus live music by the Nashville Symphony and a b…

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Music

Born in Chattanooga, Shaylen (Carroll) grew up in Allen, a suburb of Dallas, Texas. It was there that she first began performing, singing in church and acting in local children's theater. She also sang in her school choir and took private vocal, piano and guitar lessons.

When I heard that Jo Smith was releasing a new independent record, I knew her name sounded familiar.

WhistlePig Whiskey and Grammy Award-winning country music duo and reigning CMA Duo of the Year Brothers Osborne are celebrating "100 for all, all for 100" this holiday season with the launch of their new whiskey collaboration. The WhistlePig PiggyBack Legends Series: Brothers Osborne Barrel …

Features

When it comes to history, politicians and generals get all the glory, while no one gives credit to the engineers. Stephen Harriman Long is an interesting example. Were it not for Long, the city of Chattanooga might not exist.

Forget football — at least for a moment. In Tennessee, which used to be known as the “Hog and Hominy State,” November used to be known as “hog droving” season.

In 1846, Rutherford County slaveholder Robert Weakly published an ad in a Nashville newspaper offering $50 for the return of an enslaved man named Ben Singleton. In the ad, Singleton was described as “five feet five or six inches in height” and “a serviceable sprightly fellow.” He was also a…

When the Civil War broke out, the vast majority of Nashville residents sided with the Confederacy and were eager to go to war. However, one man made his loyalty to the union clear and even published his opinion in the newspaper at the most difficult of times.

Few have heard the tale of Watertown patriot Jim Monroe Bradley, a man born with a birth defect that kept him from serving in the military, who aided his country during World War II using his powerful ham radio so that families could hear the voices of their loved ones — soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen — who were convalescing in hospitals overseas.

Sequoyah is one of the most important Tennesseans to have ever lived. But no matter what book you read, video you watch or website you click on, you’ll find a different account of his life.