baitsign

Signs at boat ramps remind fishermen about invasive species. LARRY WOODY

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency asked for fishermen’s cooperation in trying to halt the spread of invasive aquatic species.

They are warned to never dump unused live bait in the water at the end of trip because invasive species could have inadvertently been mixed in. Dump leftover bait on the bank where scavengers will clean it up.

Also, thoroughly scour boat hulls, motors and other equipment after boating in different waters to avoid transferring aquatic plant and muscle species.

The spread of Asia carp – which when small resemble threadfin and gizzard shad baitfish – is a growing concern on area lakes and rivers.

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Hot shots: Kerry Hale shot a perfect round of 50 to win the Cedar City Gun Club’s recent trap shoot.

Finishing second by one shot was Tim Green at 49. Other top scores were posted by Walt West at 48, Jerry Steyer at 47, Danny Shaw at 45, Jeff George at 44 and Randell Pence at 39.

For information about gun club events and activities, contact Hale at khale386@gmail.com

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Elk on camera: a 24-hour live elk cam captures the movements of elk in a field on the East Tennessee Wildlife Management Area where they were first stocked more than a decade ago.

Since the elk roam free, sometimes they are in the field where the cam is situated, and sometimes not. The elk cam can be accessed at tnwildlife.org

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Relaxed registration: Because the pandemic has caused disruptions and closures of some clerk offices, the TWRA is granting boaters leeway in registering their boats.

Boaters are asked to carry a bill of sale with them to show TWRA officers if they are checked on the water.

Detailed information about boating registration requirements is available at tnwildlife.org or in the Tennessee Boating Guide, available for free at most outdoors outlets.

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Conservation raffle: Among the prizes up for grabs in the Tennessee Conservation Raffle is a fishing trip with famed television angler Bill Dance.

The raffle, formerly known as the elk tag raffle, is sponsored by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, and proceeds go to the state’s wildlife restoration program.

Information about buying raffle tickets and other details is available on the TWRA website at tnwildlife.org

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Backyard sanctuaries: The Tennessee Wildlife Federation offers advice on attracting watchable wildlife to a backyard. For information about habitat construction, visit the TWF website.

Email area outdoors news and photos to larrywoody@gmail.com. Please include a contact phone number.

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